• 01926 353 300

Monthly Archives: July 2018

How to Prepare Your Car Fleet for External Factors such as WLTP

How to Prepare Your Car Fleet for External Factors such as WLTP

WLTP is firmly on the horizon and looming large. As of 1st September 2018, all new car registrations will need to issue CO2 emission based on WLTP (Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicle Test Procedure) rather than the previously applied NEDCA.

A few months ago we talked here about the impact WLTP will have on company car fleets, suggesting the following three challenges:

CO2 Impact

The movement of official CO2 emissions data for a car fleet will impact a company’s carefully constructed fleet CO2 emissions target

Capital allowance claims

It will impact capital allowance claims as cars will move above the new threshold for claiming the standard rate of 18% which, as of the introduction, will be 110 g/km.

BiK Impact

In many cases, NEDC2 will effectively move the BiK of a car two brackets higher.

Unless a company has very tight control on their car fleet structure and understands the impact of these changes to a granular level, it is likely that they attempting to manage these impacts by currently observing two possible directives on company car orders:

  1. as only a selected few manufacturers have released their completed WLTP emissions figures, issue a restricted company car order list, covering only those that are WLTP compliant; severely limiting employee choice.
  2. allow older models of cars which haven’t been tested for WLTP, whilst anticipating the possibility of a negative impact on BiK tax and employers NI contributions when the actual WLTP figures are released. This could result in a hike in personal taxation and/or a request to cancel the order.

Whilst the above two solutions allow a business to navigate the uncertainty of WLTP, they are not ideal and could cause confusion, employee resentment and cost issues.

To be better placed to deal with the impact of WLTP many businesses employ the services of a Fleet category partner. A fleet category partner operates as client-side support, managing the supply chain and ensuring a helicopter-view of the whole fleet dynamic and the supply chain.

Having a completely transparent overview of the car fleet, with a firm grip on costs, compliance and replacement cycles, means the business can understand the sensitivities of the fleet to external factors such as WLTP, resulting in quick and informed decisions.

So rather than taking a compromised approach to managing WLTP, like the scenarios above, having a detailed understanding of the fleet means strategic decisions can be made that will result in the best possible outcome.

A number of our clients who are dealing with WLTP are using their transparent view of its impact to manage their order procedures accordingly, putting directives in place that enhance the medium and long-term benefit to the employee and the business.

Ultimately, having a fleet category partner allows a faster, better informed and more controlled policy procedure that can react accordingly to extraneous factors such a compliance, taxation and cost increases.

Share this Article

Imminent IFRS16 Accounting Standards Will Impact Car Fleets: Make Them Work to Your Advantage

Imminent IFRS16 Accounting Standards Will Impact Car Fleets: Make Them Work to Your Advantage

The new IFRS16 accounting standard is effective from 1Jan 2019 and will affect publicly listed companies that operate a leased company car fleet. It is broad reaching legislation that fundamentally changes the way organisations report their leases, forcing them to be recognised under an on balance sheet accounting model.

Currently such leases are classified as Operating leases and are kept off balance sheet. These Operating leases’ will now only apply to leases which are 12 months or less or where there is a ‘low value’, which is generally accepted as less than $5k.

Consequently, companies who use a lease funding model to procure their car fleet are now obliged to report this information in a different, more sophisticated manner. Currently the leasing contracts can be reported on the P&L account, meaning there is no need to have such a detailed insight into the data held within each contract.

And here is the rub.

By moving the reporting to the balance sheet, companies must now have a far more robust leasing information system.

Many of our clients are working with their accountancy partners to establish a robust means of recording data on all leases throughout their business.

Our clients have the substantial challenge of understanding what specific values they need to capture in the first instance and thereafter what may change, all proving fundamental to the design and build of their ‘lease information systems’.

Discipline issues

What has taken many by surprise, is the huge variation of lease structures and reporting practices around EMEA, limiting the granularity of reporting in some cases to the lowest common denominator. It is not unusual in some less developed markets just to receive a single monthly rental figure which includes all services whereas, in others, finance and services are itemised to a granular level.

Also, what is evident, is that most businesses up to this point, have lacked discipline and structure when it comes to recording their vehicle lease contract arrangements with their suppliers.

At best, these are dispersed across the region and, at worst, contract documentation cannot be located at all.

And the retrieval of this data from across the EMEA region is perhaps the most challenging aspect of all. Communicating with sometimes more than 80 suppliers from 30 plus countries, and attempting to extract the required data in a standardised format, is no mean feat.

The idiosyncracies of vehicle leasing also add complexity to the recording and reporting process. Unlike equipment or building leases, where the rental and term remains static, vehicle rentals and end dates can change due to mileage variations. So, not only do the supply chain need to be engaged once to collect the initial data, they also need to be kept engaged so changes in rental or terms can be accurately reported.

Collecting lease data accurately and timely will be critical to the successful adoption of IFRS16 reporting. The challenge however, as we have found, is that a complex supply structure creates a complex array of data formats. And where corporates often have centralised structures with scant resource, it is very difficult to maintain dozens of supplier relationships at the right level to retrieve and manipulate the information to the right standard.

This ability to accurately collate and manage lease data is where Fleetworx clients have a substantial head start on their peers. As part of our “Fleet Category” management services, Fleetworx holds relationships with all the fleet supply chain on ours clients’ behalf. Which means we remove the pain of collecting critical contractual data and monitoring any contractual changes due to mileage variations or otherwise. Crucially, this data is also validated, cleansed if necessary and stored in Fleetworx Centrax database.

The value for our clients comes from the single report we produce which consolidates their lease data from across the EMEA region: helping them manage their “lease information systems” more closely, more accurately and less painfully.

We consider the introduction of IFRS16 an ideal opportunity for fleet owners to align their reporting systems, develop closer relationships with the fleet supply chain and gain a more thorough understanding of the fleet category cost. By its nature this then provides an excellent opportunity to deliver best practice and savings.

With support from a professional category management partner like Fleetworx, the task of developing a birds-eye view of the fleet category can be hugely simplified, whilst the rewards can be significant.

Share this Article

Exposing Hidden Car Fleet Contract Costs

Exposing Hidden Car Fleet Contract Costs

When costing a fleet supply agreement, and choosing the right funding model and appropriate supplier, it is important to understand that the price quoted against a vehicle list is merely a price at a snapshot in time, and on a very specific configuration.

It is a price that is being provided for the purpose of comparison, either between other suppliers in a multi-bid scenario or against other suppliers in a single bid scenario. It is extremely unlikely that it will reflect the actual cost of operating the fleet over the term because of two main reasons:

Price creep
As the fleet expands and the legacy supplier is removed, the new leasing price of each type of vehicle will change over time: likely to result in an increase in the headline price that the contract was signed against.

Additional supplier margins
Although the provider may have offered significant signing-on incentives to win the business, they will always be factored into the overall contract pricing, very often with sophisticated systems to recover this investment.

And it is these margins that the supplier can apply to consumables and services that need to be understood, so they can be managed.

It is a common misconception that the only revenue elements that can be negotiated are the management fee and the margin on the financing interest.

Most fleet stakeholders assume that focusing on these means they are in control of the contract costs, however, that is, unfortunately not the case. There are in fact six cost categories within a typical leasing contract that are used to generate revenue for the lessor.

To understand these six commercial trapdoors Download the fleetworx e-book “Fleet Contracts: Avoiding Commercial Trapdoors – A Practical Guide for Procurement Departments” .

 

Share this Article